The Complete Guide to Headsets – All You Need to Know

Headsets 101 – All You Need to Know

The headset is a regular feature of offices in the 21st century. Convenient for typing and accessing information while talking to a caller, the modern headset comes in a variety of forms. Technology allows quality headsets to be clear and efficient when used while also being light and comfortable to wear.

In recent months demand for headsets has boomed as people have been forced to work from home, and it is envisaged that remote and home working will become more commonplace from now on. Where do you start when choosing the right headset? It can be bewildering looking at all the options, and that’s where we come into the picture.

Following is the most complete and comprehensive guide to buying and using headsets you can find anywhere. We’ve looked at every option and all features, so that you can see the headset that is best for you. If you’re a corporate buyer, you’ll be able to determine which fits your company’s budget and needs.

There are five main types of headset, these being:

Corded Headsets for Office Use
Cordless Headsets for Office Use
Headsets for Home Use
Mobile Headsets
Headsets for Computers

We will look at each one different type of headset in detail, so let’s start with Corded Headsets for the Office

Corded Headsets for Office Use:

The corded headset designed for use in the office is perhaps the most popular model. The direct connection is ideal for someone who sits at a desk and uses the same console and phone, and also means there is no chance of wireless drop-out that comes with the cordless model. We’re going to cover every aspect of this type of headset in detail, beginning with how it connects to your existing hardware.

How do Corded Headsets Connect?

The answer will vary depending upon the type of telephone you are using. There are various phones on the market, and they are generally split among the following three types:

– More modern models of phone will have a standard headset port that you should plug straight into. You will usually find this on the bottom end of the phone.
– Some phones use a 2.5mm headset jack, usually found on the side of the phone for convenience.
– Older phones may need an amplifier – we’ll talk about those further on – fitted before a headset can successfully connect.

It is vital you check the headset you are looking at has the compatible connection before you buy.

Equipment You Will Need:

Depending upon the type of telephone your system needs, it is clear there is some extra equipment that you might have to invest in for efficient use. One area of confusion is that of connectivity. As mentioned above there are various types of connecting plug, so let’s have a look at them.

Quick Disconnect Plug:

The Quick Disconnect plug is an invention that has saved those who use headsets a great deal of time. It is the standard fitment with most of the quality headsets on the market and will plug straight into a compatible telephone.

2.5mm headset jack plug PMC Telecom

It is so named because if you need to leave your desk the plug can be removed from the base unit easily. There is no need to remove the headset and plugging it back in is as simple as removing it. It’s a very clever and welcome design.

However, we offer a word of advice: as with many things in the world of telephony, different manufacturers use their own design of Quick Disconnect plug, so you need to be aware the headset you buy is compatible with the phone you use.

Amplifier and Direct Connection Cable:

For older phones it is sometimes assumed that a headset will plug straight in; this is not always the case. You may need an Amplifier to enable the headset and phone to work together. The Amplifier plugs into the phone – it is sometimes known as a ‘bottom cable’ – and your headset will plug into the Amplifier.

Once again, compatibility is an issue as there are different designs of Amplifier with different brands, so you need to ensure you are choosing the right one. An advantage is you get a mute button, a volume control, and a speaker with the best quality brands, and they tend to offer very clear sound.
Let’s talk separately about Amplifiers and Direct connect cables.

Amplifier:

As the name implies, the amplifier is designed to increase the sound level to a suitable degree. There are many brands of amplifier available. The amplifier unit will usually be in series between the headset and the telephone: the headset plugs into the amplifier, which then plugs into the telephone. You can control volume, mute and speaker directly using the controls on the amplifier.telephone headset amplifier PMC Telecom LTD. https://www.pmctelecom.co.uk/plantronics-vista-m22-telephone-amplifier

At this point, there are some important aspects about connectivity to consider. Imagine you have a quality headset plugged into an amplifier, which is in turn plugged into the handset. The amplifier can be turned on and off – it is not on all the time.

If your amplifier is not switched on, the headset is inactive; the handset, however, can still be used manually, without the headset. Only when the amplifier is switched on does the headset take over and become the ear and mouthpiece. We hope that’s clear as there is something more to understand.
To make a call when the headset is active, with older phones there is a necessity to remove the handset.

This will release the switch underneath the handset that allows you to access a dialling tone. Likewise, you will need to replace the handset in the cradle to finish the call. This quirk is annoying at first but soon become second nature, and it is the same with every brand and type of amplifier.

On newer phones, you may find that you can make calls without the need to lift the handset. These plug in directly and you may see a ‘Headset’ button. You can make calls without touching the headset by pressing the button and end them in the same way. The convenience of this method makes more modern phones a popular upgrade with many businesses.

We’ve talked about the controls that you have for volume and so on, so to finish this section there are a couple of things you should be aware of. Generally, an amplifier does not draw power from the phone and needs batteries (usually the common AA type) which will last for perhaps 6 months. There will be an audible notification that battery power is running low, and this will vary depending upon the brand you choose. Some amplifiers use an A/C adapter, so check the specifications when researching your model.

You will find the amplifier comes with the correct connecting cords so once you have read the manufacturer instructions you simply plug in and go.

Direct Connect Cable:

There are advantages and disadvantages in using a phone and headset that connects by direct cable. These tend to be found on newer models of image of a telephone direct connect cable.https://www.pmctelecom.co.uk/plantronics-u10p-standard-connection-lead telephone and are not universal. A direct connect cable does as it says: plugs into the phone with no need for the amplifier unit. The first advantage is that a cable will be less expensive than an amplifier – maybe under half the price, in fact – but for many users the disadvantages outweigh the positives.

With an amplifier, you get a volume control for both microphone and speaker. The result of this is excellent performance every time, as you can adjust where necessary. With a direct connect cable there are no adjustments. Your phone and headset are doing the job the same way every time. Some reports suggest that a direct connect cable will give satisfactory results in three out of four calls.

A further problem comes with the sheer number of models available. There is no uniformity between brands, so you need to ensure that the one you choose – and there are perhaps 20 different types – is compatible with your equipment. We recommend you talk to a telephony expert who will be able to help find the correct cable.

Modular Plugs:

We feel it’s important to go into fine detail when we’re talking about headsets, mainly because of the sheer variety on the market. That’s why we’re image of a telephone modular plug. PMC Telecom LTDgoing to talk about the modular plug, which is the small plastic plug on the end of either your direct connect cable or amplifier. The modular plug comes in a few varieties, each of which serve a purpose. For simplicities sake, here they are:

RJ9 headset Plug – this one is a 4 position, 4 conductor (4P4C) plug that will go into the handset and headset connector ports

RJ22 headset plug – also a 4P4C plug, this one is a different size and does the same as above.

RJ11 plug – a 6P4C connector used for telephones and modems. You will see these on the telephone you plug into the wall socket at home.

RJ45 plug – 8P8C and used for computer network connections.
When dealing with headsets, you will be using an RJ11 or RJ22 in most cases. We advise you talk to someone with experience to ensure you have compatible connections.

Headset Jack Plug

There is one further type of connector we need to talk about, the 2.5mm jack plug. You will have seen these in various applications – small metal Image of a 2.5mm headset jack plug. PMC Telecom LTD.plugs you slot into a hole on the device concerned – and they are used with some headset and telephone combinations. The jack plug option has both positive and negative aspects.

The advantage of this connection is that a telephone for this type will have a button labelled ‘headset’; this allows you to make and answer calls without lifting the handset from the cradle.

The problem is there are many different types of 2.5mm jack cord, and some are not suitable for office use as they provide poor quality performance.

Always check with an expert before you buy one of these as you need one that is specifically designed for commercial use.

Now that we’ve covered the connection options, we will move on to the type of headsets available, and the different environments they are applicable to.

Headsets and the Working Environment:

There are many factors that influence the choice of headset you should make. Do you prefer to wear your headset on the left or right? What sort of environment do you work in? Is it a heavily populated busy office, or a quiet space? Let’s look at the different options.

Noise-Cancelling Headsets:

Many headset users work in busy offices with constant background noise. This can make it difficult for the person on the other end to her you. Noise-cancelling headsets are ideal for this sort of working environment. A noise-cancelling headset will not eliminate 100% of background sounds; that is not possible. What it will do is reduce the impact of background sound by as much as 75%.image of a noise cancelling headset. PMC Telecom LTD.

However, many people assume that a noise-cancelling headset reduces background noise for the wearer. This is not the case. It will only help the person on the other end of the call.

The headset works with a clever microphone design that is mounted on an extended arm or boom. The microphone is a two-piece affair, with one picking up the wearer’s voice and transmitting it down the line, while the other part deals with nullifying background noise.

It effectively boosts your voice – the wearer – while reducing all other noises around you as best it can. If you work in a large office with a lot of people, or in a compact area with a few workmates, this is the sort of microphone you should be investing in to improve the sound quality of your calls.
If you work in a quieter environment, you will benefit from a Voice-Tube headset.

Voice-Tube Headsets:

The voice-tube headset focuses on your voice and ignores the problem of background noise (as it is designed to be used in a quiet environment). TheImage of a voice tube headset. PMC Telecom LTD. result is a very high quality of sound for the person on the receiving end. You will find that headsets are available in both configurations – voice-tube and noise-cancelling – as the difference is the technology in the microphone.

Testing your working environment is essential before you make a choice. In your usual working environment, listen for background noises and you’ll soon discover whether anything is interfering with your call quality. Voice-tube headsets tend to cost less than the noise-cancelling equivalent, so it is certainly worth carrying out tests before you buy.

Before we talk about comfort and how to wear a headset, there is one further essential factor to consider, and that’s how to position the microphone.

Positioning the Headset Microphone and Maintenance.

It stands to reason that there will be an ideal position for the microphone on your headset. All types come with adjustable microphone booms so you can find the best solution. The general rule of thumb – for both noise-cancelling and voice-tube models – is to ensure the microphone is a close to ¼” from the side of the mouth – and not directly over it. Headset microphones are optimised for this position; hence it will result in a clear voice to the recipient.

There’s also the subject of headset and microphone maintenance. Many people eat while wearing a headset, but this can cause debris to gather in the very fine mesh covering that is at the end of the voice tube on that type of microphone. Make up can also get onto this mesh screen and can cause blockage. Any blockage at the end of the voice tube will reduce sound quality at the other end.

To this end, it is strongly recommended that the voice tube itself is replaced every few months for optimal performance. Replacements are not expensive and can be bought from the supplier of the headset and are easy to fit.

Take good care of a headset and it will last a long time, but neglect it and it may become damaged and need replacing. Now we need to talk about personal preferences in wearing a headset.

Over the Head or Over the Ear?

The various brands in the headset market offer a choice of different styles. Personal choice plays a large part in what will be right for each individual. Largely, the choice is between the over the head design – in which the headset is attached to a band that sits over the top of the head – or the over the ear design, which sits behind the ear for support and is favoured by many users for light weight and comfort.

Image of a overhead headsetImage of a over the ear headset

While comfort is a major deciding factor with headsets, there are other factors to consider that are equally important. Different styles of headset are preferable depending upon the environment in which they will be used.

For offices and other spaces with continual and notable background noise, the over the head type of headset is usually preferred. These tend to have earpieces with cushions that can help block some of the unwanted noise. There is a comfort element to the cushioned ear which some users prefer.

These headsets are known as ‘binaural’ as they cover both ears and are used in jobs where the user needs to concentrate solely on the person on the line.

There are situations where you will benefit from an over the ear headset. If your job requires you to converse often with others in the office it is clear that a headset that leaves at least one ear free is the better option, so you may want to look at over the ear headsets in this instance. These are known as ‘monaural’ headsets and are a popular choice.

The light weight and compact nature of the monaural design makes it the more popular for the modern office, and they can be worn on either ear.
There is one other type of headset you might consider, this being the convertible headset.

These are supplied with various ear pieces so you can choose which one suits you best and are popularly used on reception desks where more than one person may be required to use the same headset. They are easy to switch between various configurations and are surprisingly versatile.
Before we move on and talk about wireless headsets, there are a few accessories we think are worth mentioning.

Many users find that the earpieces on binaural headsets tend to get caught up in long hair. A set of leather-style covers can be fitted over the top enabling easy removal with no impact on sound or voice quality. Other accessories include a ‘Y Cord’ which allows two people to listen into a call. These are used in training new employees and in assessment situations. You can also buy extension cords for when the user needs to be away from the desk during a call.

The above section has been about corded headsets for the office, and some of the information – that regarding microphones and different styles of headset, for example – will also apply to our next section, where we talk about Cordless Headsets for Office Use.

Cordless Headsets for Office Use:

The main difference between cordless headsets and those described above is the lack of a direct physical connection between the headset and the telephone. This has its advantages – the wearer is available to move around during the call within range of the Wi-Fi signal, for example – and they are preferred by many users.

The headset will come with a base unit – this acts as a charger and the wireless receiver – that plugs into the telephone using one of the connecting methods described above. Some designs see the base unit plugged into the handset port on the phone, others use the modular connector. As with all such devices, there are many variations hence the importance of understanding which one you need. We will begin by describing how the two different versions – plug into handset and plug into modular port – work.

Using a Plug Into Handset Headset:

This is by far the most commonly seen type of cordless – sometimes called wireless – headset design. The base unit and transmitter plugs directly into the headset port on the telephone. Effectively, this type of headset replaces the traditional telephone handset. The advantages of this design are many.

Let’s say you have an incoming call: you press the ‘call control’ button on your headset. This activates the headset for use. You then need to lift the handset as if answering the phone in the normal fashion. The call is now active, and you can communicate with the caller through the microphone.

If you need to make a call, take the handset off the phone to get a dialling tone, turn the headset on, and you’re ready to make the call. You can move around once the call has been activated, and the Wi-Fi range of these devices is usually sufficient to cover a decent size of office.

Once your call is over, replacing the handset on the phone will close the call. It’s up to the wearer whether they choose to switch the headset on and off between calls, and a popular choice is to leave it activated for convenience. Note that we have not talked about remote activated calls as we will cover that aspect separately.

Using a Plug Into Headset Port Model:

This version of headset plugs into a specially designated headset port on the telephone unit. Once again, you can choose to leave the headset switched on and active at all times or press the ‘call control’ button when making or receiving a call.

You do not need to touch the telephone handset with this design of headset, which for some people is a convenience. You simply use the ‘headset’ button on the telephone keypad to activate the call. As with the above, once the call is underway you are free to move around while communicating.
To end the call, press the ‘headset’ button and it will cut off. One important distinction is that you cannot make remote calls with this style of headset. Now is an appropriate point to talk about remote call activation.

Remote Calling and Hang Up:

The major advantage of a wireless headset is the ability to make and take calls from other than a set position. This can be done with the plug into handset port models only. You also need an accessory called a ‘handset lifter’ or, on later model phones, an ‘EHS Cable’. Each of these are devices that sense electronically when a call comes in, or when you ask to make a call.

A handset lifter is a small accessory that physically lifts the telephone handset, allowing for a ring tone to be found or a call to be answered. It does so via a small motor. If a call comes in, your headset will notify you audibly, and you can press the ‘call control’ button on the headset and answer the call. Once finished, press the button again and the lifter will drop the handset, ending the call.

EHS does the same thing for later model phones, but without the need to lift and drop the handset. It is essential you speak to someone with knowledge in the market to ensure you purchase the right model.

Why would you need remote calling? Having the ability to make and take calls when away from one’s desk has been proven to be of benefit productivity-wise. It also allows the full benefit of the wireless headset to be obtained. Be aware that if you need to transfer calls, you will still need to return to your desk, but otherwise there is no need to be in a particular spot, only to be within Wi-Fi range of the base unit.

Now that we’ve given you an idea of the different types of cordless office headsets, we think it wise to explain what is required to complete the system.

The Base Unit:

The main part of each type of wireless headset is the base unit. This also acts as a charger for the headset itself and is the Wi-Fi hub. They will come in different designs for various brands, but each does essentially the same thing. The base unit connects directly to the telephone by one of the connections we’ve described above. It is on the base unit that you will find the various adjustable functions, these being:

Microphone – by adjusting the microphone settings you can find the perfect level for clear and audible transmission of your voice, making it easier for the person at the other end to hear you clearly.

Speaker – adjusting the speaker level means you can set the level of volume that you hear to enable efficient conversation both ways.

Compatibility – this is a fine-tuning function that is used to get the mix of voice and speaker as close to perfection as possible.

Once you have a good reception level, you’ll find that your headset has a fine tune function for individual calls. Sometimes you may find an echo affecting calls. This can be eradicated by using the adjustable functions on the base unit.
The base will also have a cradle into which you place the headset when not in use. This ensures your headset will always be charged and ready for use when needed.

Positioning the Headphone Microphone:

All types of headset come with adjustable microphone booms so you can find the best position. The general rule of thumb – for both noise-cancelling and voice-tube models – is to ensure the microphone is a close to ¼” from the side of the mouth – and not directly over it. Headset microphones are optimised for this position, hence it will result in a clear voice to the recipient.

There’s also the subject of headset and microphone maintenance. Many people eat while wearing a headset, but this can cause debris to gather in the very fine mesh covering that is at the end of the voice tube on that type of microphone. Make up can also get onto this mesh screen and can cause blockage. Any blockage at the end of the voice tube will reduce sound quality at the other end.

To this end, it is strongly recommended that the voice tube itself is replaced every few months for optimal performance. Replacements are not expensive and can be bought from the supplier of the headset and are easy to fit.

Take good care of a headset and it will last a long time but neglect it and it may become damaged and need replacing.

Noise-Cancelling and Voice-Tube Headsets:

Many headset users work in busy offices with constant background noise. This can make it difficult for the person on the other end to her you. Noise-cancelling headsets are ideal for this sort of working environment. A noise-cancelling headset will not eliminate 100% of background sounds; that is not possible. What it will do is reduce the impact of background sound by as much as 75%.

The noise-cancelling headset will only help the person on the other end of the call, not the user. The headset works with a clever microphone design that is mounted on an extended arm or boom. The microphone is a two-piece affair, with one picking up the wearer’s voice and transmitting it down the line, while the other part deals with nullifying background noise.

It effectively boosts your voice – the wearer – while reducing all other noises around you as best it can. If you work in a large office with a lot of people, or in a compact area with a few workmates, this is the sort of microphone you should be investing in to improve the sound quality of your calls.

If you work in a quieter environment, you will benefit from a Voice-Tube headset. The voice-tube headset focuses on your voice and ignores the problem of background noise. The result is a very high quality of sound for the person on the receiving end.

Testing your working environment is essential before you make a choice. In your usual working environment, listen for background noises and you’ll soon discover whether anything is interfering with your call quality. Voice-tube headsets tend to cost less than the noise-cancelling equivalent, so it is certainly worth carrying out tests before you buy.

Over the Head or Over the Ear Headsets?

The various brands in the headset market offer a choice of different styles. Personal choice plays a large part in what will be right for each individual. Largely, the choice is between the over the head design – in which the headset is attached to a band that sits over the top of the head – or the over the ear design, which sits behind the ear for support and is favoured by many users for light weight and comfort.

While comfort is a major deciding factor with headsets, there are other factors to consider that are equally important. Different styles of headset are preferable depending upon the environment in which they will be used.

For offices and other spaces with continual and notable background noise, the over the head type of headset is usually preferred. These tend to have earpieces with cushions that can help block some of the unwanted noise. There is a comfort element to the cushioned ear which some users prefer. These headsets are known as ‘binaural’ as they cover both ears and are used in jobs where the user needs to concentrate solely on the person on the line.

There are situations where you will benefit from an over the ear headset. If your job requires you to converse often with others in the office it is clear that a headset that leaves at least one ear free is the better option, so you may want to look at over the ear headsets in this instance. These are known as ‘monaural’ headsets and are a popular choice.

The light weight and compact nature of the monaural design makes it the more popular for the modern office, and they can be worn on either ear.
There is one other type of headset you might consider, this being the convertible headset.

These are supplied with various ear pieces so you can choose which one suits you best and are popularly used on reception desks where more than one person may be required to use the same headset.

There are a few accessories that are also worth looking at. A set of leather-style covers can be fitted over the top of your ear pieces, enabling easy removal with no impact on sound or voice quality. Other accessories include a ‘Y Cord’ which allows two people to listen into a call. These are used in training new employees and in assessment situations. You can also buy extension cords for when the user needs to be away from the desk during a call.

Headsets for Home Use:

Headsets can add convenience to taking and making calls in the home. Headsets for home use may not be as high quality as those designed for commercial purposes, but they still make a useful addition to your telephone system. You have a choice of corded or wireless devices, and various connectivity options as described in the sections covering office devices.

Telephone Headset System:

The most popular home headset system is one that is a complete package. The telephone headset system involves a base unit – as described in the office sections – plus the headset. These systems can be corded or wireless. Wireless systems make the most sense as you can wear your headset when gardening, for example, and answer or make calls anywhere in Wi-Fi range.

You will need a standard telephone wall port to plug into, and that’s about it. You can make calls and take calls remotely if you choose the cordless version, adding great versatility to your telephone system. These are ideal for home-run businesses.

Headsets for Cordless Telephones:

If you have a cordless phone set up at home, you will find there is usually a 2.5mm jack point on the phone handset itself. By plugging a headset that uses this form of connection – see earlier for an explanation of 2.5mm jack points – you can make and take calls by headset. However, you will have to have the handset with you to do so. The sound quality provided by this method is not of the best quality, and it is recommended that you use the above type of home headset if at all possible.

Single or Multiline Systems:

Most home headset systems are for single line use, but there are some that can handle up to four lines. These tend to be more expensive and require the use of a telephone connection point. To make a call when the headset is active, there is a necessity to remove the handset.

This will release the switch underneath the handset that allows you to access a dialling tone. Likewise, you will need to replace the handset in the cradle to finish the call. This quirk is annoying at first but soon become second nature, and it is the same with every brand and type of system of this kind.

Sound Quality:

As we mentioned earlier the sound quality of a home headset system will not match that of a commercial version. For people who have never used a headset, the effect will be impressive. For those who are used to a commercial headset, it will be disappointing. However, there is no doubt that a headset for the home is a very useful purchase, and we recommend looking carefully for the best wireless system you can afford.

Mobile Headsets:

Why would you want a headset to use with a mobile phone? Once again, it’s the convenience of not having to physically handle your phone while talking. You could be walking or in a car, or on another form of transport, and a headset will make life a lot easier. The mobile phone is ubiquitous these days, and most if not all can be used with a headset.

As is typical of the industry there is more than one type of connection; Apple and Blackberry devices use a 3.5mm jack plug, while all other opt for a standard 2.5mm version. There is also the Bluetooth wireless option which may be preferable.

2.5mm Corded Headset:

These headsets are for use with all mobile phones that have a 2.5mm jack port in the side or on one end. Simple to use – you plug it in and you’re ready to go – they are made by many different brands.

Your phone will be aware when a headset is plugged in and it will work automatically. These sets tend to be small and not robustly made. This means they break quite easily, especially when the wires get tangled. However, they are cheap to buy.

The downsides include a lack of volume control – you do this by controls on your phone which will have a maximum level – and the aforementioned lack of robustness. However, they are convenient, and many come with a mute button. Some commercial-standard headsets use the 2.5mm jack, so they may be compatible with a mobile phone.

iPhone and Blackberry 3.5mm Corded Headset:

This type of headset is for use with Apple and Blackberry headsets, but you are not limited to these as there are adapters available that allow you to use headsets such as the above. These are cheap to buy and open up the market for people with such phones. Your Apple or Blackberry phone most likely came with a headset, but as above they tend to be flimsy and break easily.

Branded products such as these can be more expensive than equivalent 2.5mm models, so the adapter is a sensible purchase at very little cost. The same negatives apply as above.

Wireless Bluetooth Headsets:

Bluetooth technology has broadened the options in the telecommunications world by a massive degree. To explain it simply: Bluetooth is a system that allows two devices to ‘pair’ wirelessly. It has a range of just over 30ft. Bluetooth has its own dedicated frequency range and when in action creates what the industry knows as a Personal Area Network or PAN.

Bluetooth is widely used for sharing data and voice over short distances and is an ideal solution for a wireless mobile headset. Pairing is done by selecting he relevant mode on your headset. A signal transmits that then makes your headset ‘discoverable’. A Bluetooth device within range – the mobile phone – will detect it and request if you wish to pair. Once you agree the two devices are connected, and you can take calls through your headset.

There are two popular types of headset – over or in the ear. Over the ear is akin to a traditional set of headphones with padded earpieces, while in the ear uses very small ‘gels’ that fit inside the ear and are surprisingly comfortable. They are also easy to lose, so it pays to buy replacement sets just in case.

As things stand, a Bluetooth headset will need charging after as little as 5 hours use, with some models lasting up to 15 hours or so. Charging is as you charge your phone, and it is advisable to keep your headset on charge when not in use.

Computer Headsets:

Computer headsets are designed for use with a PC or laptop. They are used when taking or making calls using Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) Image of a USB computer headsetplatforms that involve talking to others via the computer rather than a traditional telephone system. This technology is changing the way we communicate and is being improved all the time. For efficient use you will need a high-speed broadband connection or quality will be very poor.

Computer headsets come in corded or wireless forms. The advantage of the wireless versions is the same as all other wireless headsets discussed here: the ability to move around when on a call. There are three types of connection for these devices and they are notably different to all other headsets we have talked about.

A computer headset will connect either by a 3.5mm Soundboard connector, a USB-A, or the smaller USB-C connector. The Soundboard connector features a pair of 3.5mm jack plugs, one of which is for the microphone and the second for the speaker. Once plugged in the headset is ready to use as it over-rides the normal sound system on the computer.

USB-A is the standard plug that is used for all normal computer peripherals, and your computer will have a choice of USB ports to plug into. USB-C is the smaller version you may be familiar with that is designed for smaller devices. The advantage of all three connections is that they will automatically configure for use. Plugging them in for the first time is the installation process and takes no more than a few minutes.

You can choose from wireless or corded headsets for use with your computer, and either over the head or over the ear models – as described earlier – and take advantage of the latest VoIP technology to talk to people across the world without the need for a traditional telephone line or a mobile phone.

That covers all aspects of headsets for the office, home or for mobile use. If you need further information, contact PMC Telecom and one of our team will be happy to help.